Blog

Please Follow Me On All My Social Media, Blogs, and Websites:

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/johnpaul.runyon

https://twitter.com/johnpaulrunyon

https://www.linkedin.com/in/runyonjohnpaulmd/

Blogs:
https://drjohnpaulrunyon.wordpress.com/

http://drjohnpaulrunyon.tumblr.com/

http://johnpaulrunyon.weebly.com/

Websites:
JohnPaulRunyon.com

JohnPaulRunyon.org

JohnPaulRunyon.net

John-Paul-Runyon.com

JohnPaulRunyonInfo.com

Advertisements

What We Learn When Two Ruthless Killers, Heart Disease and Cancer, Reveal a Common Root

h c

If inflammation triggers coronary disease, might targeting it directly — beyond simply reducing cholesterol — decrease the risk of heart attacks? Over the course of a decade, Libby and Ridker found themselves focusing on a molecule involved in inflammation called interleukin-1 beta. By the mid-2000s, they heard of a new drug — an interleukin-1-beta inhibitor — that was used to treat exceedingly rare inflammatory diseases. In April 2011, Ridker’s team started enrolling 10,000 patients who carried signs of inflammation and were at very high risk for coronary disease in a randomized study to determine the effects of the inhibitor on heart disease and strokes.

Read Article:  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/27/magazine/can-heart-disease-shed-light-on-cancer.html

From bug to drug: Tick saliva could be key to treating heart disease

tix

Proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a potentially fatal form of heart disease, according to new Oxford University research.

Myocarditis can cause sudden cardiac death in young adults, and occurs when the heart muscle becomes inflamed, often as a result of an infection caused by common viruses. The study, funded by the British Heart Foundation, identified a protein within tick saliva which can bind to and neutralise several chemicals called chemokines, which are released in the heart during myocarditis. The chemokines attract cells which cause inflamation, but by neutralising the chemicals, tick saliva could potentially prevent this inflamation.

The study, funded by the British Heart Foundation, identified a protein within tick saliva which can bind to and neutralise several chemokines, potentially preventing chronic inflammatory disease in the process.

Read Article:  https://www.mdlinx.com/cardiology/top-medical-news/article/2017/06/29/7228714

Fascinating research into slug slime as a potential new surgical glue

slug slimne

For a glue that holds up inside the body, turn to the humble slug, Arion subfuscus. A new super-sticky material mimics slug slime’s ability to stick on slick wet surfaces and could lead to more effective medical adhesives.

The material has two parts: a sticky layer that attaches to a surface, and a shock-absorbing layer that reduces strain. That makes the adhesive less likely to snap off.

Read Article:  https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/slug-slime-inspires-new-type-surgical-glue?tgt=nr