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How the Internet can be harmful to your heart.

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Scientists and clinicians from Swansea and Milan have found that some people who use the internet a lot experience significant physiological changes such as increased heart rate and blood pressure when they finish using the internet.

The study involved 144 participants, aged 18 to 33 years, having their and blood pressure measured before and after a brief session. Their and self-reported internet-addiction were also assessed. The results showed increases in physiological arousal on terminating the internet session for those with problematically-high internet usage. These increases in heart rate and blood pressure were mirrored by increased feelings of anxiety. However, there were no such changes for participants who reported no internet-usage problems.

The study, published in the international peer-reviewed journal, PLOS ONE, is the first controlled-experimental demonstration of physiological changes as a result of internet exposure.

Read more at: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2017-05-internet-heart-blood-pressure.html#jCp

What everyone should know about heart health.

Your heart works hard for you nonstop for your whole life. So show it some TLC.

Making small changes in your habits can make a real difference to your ticker.

“It’s like finding the fountain of youth,” says Donald Lloyd-Jones, MD, of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. “People who follow these steps not only live longer, but they also spend a lot more time healthy, without cardiovascular disease.”

Even better? You don’t have to work on all 10 steps at once. Even if you improve just one or two of these areas, you can make yourself less likely to get heart disease. Of course, the more tips on this list you follow, the better. So let’s get started.

1. Aim for lucky number seven.

The next time you’re tempted to stay up later than you should, remember how comfy that pillow will feel — and how good a full night’s sleep is for your heart.

In one study, young and middle-age adults who slept 7 hours a night had less calcium in their arteries (an early sign of heart disease) than those who slept 5 hours or less or those who slept 9 hours or more.

The type of shut-eye they got was important, too. Adults who said they got good-quality sleep also had healthier arteries than those who didn’t sleep soundly.

If you have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep at night, or if you don’t feel refreshed after a full night in bed, talk to your doctor about how healthier sleep habits might improve your slumber.

2. Keep the pressure off.

That cuff squeezing your arm at every doctor’s visit is important. It measures the amount of pressure flowing through your arteries with every heartbeat.

If your blood pressure gets too high, the extra force can damage artery walls and create scar tissue. That makes it harder for blood and oxygen to get to and from the heart. The heart has to pump harder and gets worn out faster. If it can’t get enough oxygen, parts can start to die.

Get your blood pressure checked every 3-5 years if you’re 18-39. If you’re 40 or older, or if you have high blood pressure, check it every year.

Cut back on salt, limit alcohol to no more than one to two drinks a day, favor healthy eating habits (think fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein) manage your stress, and work out. These changes are often enough to bring your blood pressure back down into the normal range. If not, your doctor might recommend you also take medication.

Read Entire Article:  http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/prevention-15/heart-healthy/12-tips-for-better-heart-health

What everyone can learn about heart health from previous generations

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Narrowed, aging blood vessels, which put most older American adults at risk for heart disease and strokes, are not inevitable. This fact was underscored by a newly published study of a population in the Bolivian Amazon.

Among these indigenous South Americans, known as the Tsimane (pronounced chee-MAH-nay), coronary atherosclerosis was found to be one-fifth as common than in the United States. CT scans of the hearts of 705 Tsimane adults aged 40 to 94 revealed that nearly nine in 10 had clean coronary arteries and faced no risk of heart disease. The research team estimated that an 80-year-old in the Tsimane group has the same vascular age as an American in his mid-50s.

Read Entire Article:  https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/10/well/live/learning-from-our-parents-heart-health-mistakes.html

Read a noteworthy article about women’s heart health.

“Awareness of women’s heart health has increased, but more research, outreach required

Although it is the No. 1 killer of women, CVD has long been overlooked and underrepresented as a significant threat to women’s health. The common misconception that CVD primarily affects men has prevailed for most of modern medical history and, until as recently 2004, there was no large-scale public awareness campaign dedicated to women’s heart health.”

Read Entire Article:  http://www.healio.com/cardiology/chd-prevention/news/print/cardiology-today/%7B98a3a1a3-b158-4cd7-a7f4-e6646dc8dcad%7D/awareness-of-womens-heart-health-has-increased-but-more-research-outreach-required

‘Good heart health extends the ‘golden years’

People with better heart health during young adulthood and middle age end up living longer and spending fewer years later in life with any kind of chronic disease, according to new research.

This prolonged good health also saves money on health care and reduces Medicare spending, the study team writes in the journal Circulation.

“As our population is getting older, it’s important to understand how we can help individuals maintain healthier lives as they age,” said lead author Norrina Allen of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

About 41 percent of the U.S. population will have cardiovascular disease by 2030, according to the American Heart Association. It is already the leading cause of death in the United States.

Read Entire Article:  http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-aging-heart-idUSKBN1811VD