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Fascinating research into slug slime as a potential new surgical glue

slug slimne

For a glue that holds up inside the body, turn to the humble slug, Arion subfuscus. A new super-sticky material mimics slug slime’s ability to stick on slick wet surfaces and could lead to more effective medical adhesives.

The material has two parts: a sticky layer that attaches to a surface, and a shock-absorbing layer that reduces strain. That makes the adhesive less likely to snap off.

Read Article:  https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/slug-slime-inspires-new-type-surgical-glue?tgt=nr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heart failure risk may be affected by weight gain

weight gain

Excess weight could lead to heart failure in time, according to new research
Published Friday  21 July 2017
Gaining just a little weight can put a person at an increased risk of heart failure, a new study shows. Any weight gain may affect heart function in time, altering the muscle’s structure and potentially leading to damaging outcomes.

Childhood Asthma Linked to Heart Disease Later in Life

asthma_boy_469168052_web_0

For the first time, the history of asthma in childhood has been associated with an increased risk of left ventricle thickening in adulthood, a heart condition called Left Ventricular Hypertrophy (LVH). While many questions have yet to be answered involving what specific mechanisms lead to LVH as a person with asthma grows older, this study adds to the collection of literature connecting asthma and cardiovascular conditions.

Read Article:  https://www.labroots.com/trending/health-and-medicine/6298/childhood-asthma-linked-heart-disease-life

From bug to drug: Tick saliva could be key to treating heart disease

ticks

University of Oxford News

 Proteins found in tick saliva could be used to treat a potentially fatal form of heart disease, according to new Oxford University research.

Myocarditis can cause sudden cardiac death in young adults, and occurs when the heart muscle becomes inflamed, often as a result of an infection caused by common viruses. The study, funded by the British Heart Foundation, identified a protein within tick saliva which can bind to and neutralise several chemicals called chemokines, which are released in the heart during myocarditis. The chemokines attract cells which cause inflamation, but by neutralising the chemicals, tick saliva could potentially prevent this inflamation.

The study, funded by the British Heart Foundation, identified a protein within tick saliva which can bind to and neutralise several chemokines, potentially preventing chronic inflammatory disease in the process.