Subtle Signs You Could Have a Heart Problem

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Do you suspect there’s something wrong with your heart? Watch out for these symptoms, and see your doctor if you’re concerned about them.

Heart woes

Thanks to more education about healthy eating and advancements in treatment, fewer people die of heart disease than in the past. That said, clogged heart arteries are still the number-one cause of death in the United States. Although heart attack symptoms can be a scary first sign of trouble (and keep in mind women have different symptoms than men), sometimes the body offers up more subtle clues that something is amiss with your ticker. The following is a list of symptoms that might be worth a chat with your doctor. But they may also be caused by a bunch of other things, so don’t freak out. (Many of these are also symptoms of anemia, so check out 15 Signs You May Have an Iron Deficiency.) Only your real doctor—not Dr. Google—can really tell you if these symptoms mean anything at all.

You’re extremely tried

This isn’t just lack of sleep tired; it is extreme fatigue. Think of how you feel when you get the flu, except this doesn’t go away. “A lot of women kind of blow this off assuming it’s nothing and that they will feel better, but in reality it could be a sign of your heart,” says Suzanne Steinbaum, DO, Director of Women’s Heart Health at the Heart and Vascular Institute at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. The reason why you feel that way: It comes down to a lack of oxygen. “The heart is struggling and straining to deliver the oxygen to your body.” That said, plenty of people feel tired for lots of reasons. If this is your only symptom, you can talk to your doctor, but don’t conclude you have heart trouble based on this alone.

Your feet swell

Feet swelling can occur for a bunch of garden-variety reasons, such as pregnancy, varicose veins (which are unsightly but not dangerous), or when you travel and have limited ability to move around. It can also be a sign of heart failure, a chronic condition in which the heart pumps blood inefficiently. “Swelling can also occur when the heart valve doesn’t close normally,” says Michael Miller, MD, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Some medications for blood pressure and diabetes could also cause swelling, says Dr. Miller. “Heart-related foot swelling is usually accompanied by other symptoms that include shortness of breath and/or fatigue,” he says. If you recently developed foot swelling, see your doctor to determine the cause and how best to treat it.

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